Glastonbury Public Schools Foreign Language

Elementary Curriculum

The Spanish Elementary Program in Glastonbury (FLES)

The Glastonbury Foreign Language Program is based upon the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. In grade 1, students receive Spanish instruction twice a week for 25 minutes. Students in grades 2-5 receive Spanish instruction three times a week for 25 minutes. Departmental mid-year and year-end assessment samplings are conducted annually as a means to inform both curriculum and instruction. Students in fifth grade also take the ACTFL Assessment of Performance Towards Proficiency (AAPPL) a test of Interpersonal Listening and Speaking (ILS) as a benchmark of their language assessment.

First Grade Spanish

Proficiency Target: Novice

In first grade, students receive Spanish instruction two times a week for 25 minutes with lessons centered on the essential question: “Who am I? How do we name things in a different language?” Students learn the Spanish language and Hispanic culture through direct instruction, stories, poems, songs, games, and activities. Students who meet expectations in first grade can communicate on very familiar topics using a variety of words and phrases that they have practiced and memorized. The topics covered in first grade include colors, numbers, shapes, family members, weather and more. Students can recognize some familiar words and phrases from these topics when they hear them spoken or see them written. Students can also introduce themselves, say hello and goodbye, express how they are feeling, and respond to simple questions.

Units of Study include:

  • How do people greet one another and introduce themselves in Spanish?
  • What holidays and special days do people celebrate?
  • How do we name the objects in our classroom?
  • How do we count objects in Spanish?
  • How do we name an object's shape and color?
  • Who are the members of a family?
  • How many people and pets could be part of a family?
  • What are my body parts named in Spanish?
  • Who are the people in my school? What are the different jobs in my school?

Second Grade Spanish

Proficiency Target: Novice

In second grade, students receive Spanish instruction three times a week for 25 minutes with lessons centered on the essential question: “Who am I? Who are my neighbors?” The cultural context for second grade instruction is Mexico, our neighbor to the south, which parallels the second grade Social Studies curriculum. Students learn the Spanish language and Hispanic culture through direct instruction, stories, poems, songs, games, and activities. Students who meet expectations in second grade can communicate on very familiar topics using a variety of words and phrases that they have practiced and memorized. The topics covered in second grade include the calendar, weather, clothing, places in the community, pets, farm animals, and more. Students can recognize some familiar words and phrases from these topics when they hear them spoken or see them written. Students can also introduce themselves, say hello and goodbye, express how they are feeling, state their likes and dislikes, and respond to simple questions.

Units of Study include:

  • How do we read a Spanish calendar?
  • What are some holidays and celebrations in Mexico?
  • How can I share my feelings and ask others to share theirs?
  • How do I describe the weather in Spanish?
  • What is the weather like in my community and in Mexico? What clothes are worn?
  • What are the characteristics of rural, suburban, and urban areas? What are the similarities and differences between communities in the United States and Mexico?
  • How do I name and describe farm animals?
  • Who are the important people in my family/life?

Third Grade Spanish

Proficiency Target: Novice

In third grade, students receive Spanish instruction three times a week for 25 minutes with lessons centered on the essential question: “Who am I? What do we find in our global community?” The cultural contexts for third grade instruction are Spain and China, which parallel the third grade Social Studies curriculum. Students learn the Spanish language and Hispanic culture through direct instruction, stories, poems, songs, games, and activities. Students who meet expectations in third grade can communicate on very familiar topics using a variety of words and phrases that they have practiced and memorized. Students are also beginning to combine words and phrases to create simple sentences, sometimes supported by memorized language. The topics covered in third grade include world geography, fruits and animals from around the world, and more. Students can recognize some familiar words, phrases and simple sentences from these topics when they hear them spoken or see them written. Students can also introduce themselves, say hello and goodbye, express how they are feeling, state additional personal information, indicate their likes and dislikes, and respond to and ask simple questions.

Units of Study include:

  • How do I read a map and globe? What is an example of a continent, country, state, city, and town?
  • What is the culture of Spain?
  • What is the culture of China?
  • Where do different types of fruit come from? How can I express my personal preference for fruit?
  • What are some of the animals found around the world?

Fourth Grade Spanish

Proficiency Target: Novice

In fourth grade, students receive Spanish instruction three times a week for 25 minutes with lessons centered on the essential question: “Who am I? How are we connected to the Caribbean?” The cultural context for fourth grade instruction is the Caribbean with a focus on Puerto Rico. Students learn the Spanish language and Hispanic culture through direct instruction, stories, poems, songs, games, and activities. Students who meet expectations in fourth grade can communicate on very familiar topics using a variety of words and phrases that they have practiced and memorized. Students are also becoming more comfortable combining words and phrases to create simple sentences, sometimes supported by memorized language. The topics covered in fourth grade include the seasons around the world, sports and leisure activities, the house, and more. Students can recognize some familiar words, phrases and simple sentences from these topics when they hear them spoken or see them written. Students can also introduce themselves, say hello and goodbye, express how they are feeling, respond to and ask simple questions.

Units of Study include:

  • Who are the Puerto Ricans?
  • What are some of the holidays and celebrations common in Puerto Rico?
  • How might sports and leisure activities be different/similar in the United States and the Caribbean?
  • What are the differences and similarities between sandwiches I eat and sandwiches from other cultures?
  • How do people travel and explore?
  • Would my schedule be different if I lived in a different country?
  • What factors impact the design of a house?

Fifth Grade Spanish

Fifth Grade Spanish

Proficiency Target: Novice

In fifth grade, students receive Spanish instruction three times a week for 25 minutes with lessons centered on the essential questions: “Who am I? Who are the people of the Americas?” The cultural context for fifth grade instruction is the Spanish-speaking regions of Central and South America with a focus on Peru. Students learn the Spanish language and Hispanic culture through direct instruction, stories, poems, songs, games, and activities. Students who meet expectations in fifth grade can communicate and exchange information about familiar topics using phrases and simple sentences, sometimes supported by memorized language. The topics covered in fifth grade include the geography of the Americas, descriptions of personality and physical appearance, typical food eaten in the Americas, the arpillera and more. Students can often understand words, phrases, and simple sentences related to everyday life and topics studied in class. They can also understand the main idea of short and simple texts, conversations or presentations when the topic is familiar. Students can also introduce themselves, say hello and goodbye, express how they are feeling, respond to and ask simple questions.

Units of Study include:

  • Which countries around the world speak Spanish?
  • What factors influence my daily routine?
  • How do I describe myself? How can I describe others?
  • What is the culture of Peru?
  • How is the rainforest important in the lives of the people of South America? How is it important to me?
  • What is an aprillera?